Harvard Law School

Stuck in legal limbo-Some Syrian refugees in Jordan lack documentation, so they wait and wait

February 28, 2017

 

When human rights clinical instructor Anna Crowe first began documenting the legal challenges faced by Syrian refugees in Jordan, she found a tangled system that put their lives on hold. Thousands of refugees, stuck in legal limbo, were vulnerable to risks ranging from statelessness to relocation to refugee camps.

In Jordan, Syrian refugees must register with the interior ministry to obtain identity cards, which allow them access to health care, education, work permits, and humanitarian assistance. But to obtain the cards, the refugees need to show their original Syrian… Read more about Stuck in legal limbo-Some Syrian refugees in Jordan lack documentation, so they wait and wait

One for the ages

One for the ages

June 26, 2015

Harvard analysts see fundamental shift in ruling legalizing gay marriage nationally

What’s So Bad About a 10-Mile Walk to School? Two views of educational challenges in South Africa

What’s So Bad About a 10-Mile Walk to School? Two views of educational challenges in South Africa

April 20, 2015

In January 2015, a team from Harvard Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic (IHRC) travelled to Nqutu, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, to address the challenges facing students who must travel long distances – often in extremely dangerous conditions – to access their education. 

Katie King ’16 has been working with the IHRC since last September on issues related to the right to education in South Africa. She spent her 1L summer interning at Equal Education Law Centre in Cape Town, South Africa. David Victorson ’16, a student in the… Read more about What’s So Bad About a 10-Mile Walk to School? Two views of educational challenges in South Africa

The ‘Killer Robots’ Accountability Gap

April 9, 2015

(Geneva) – Programmers, manufacturers, and military personnel could all escape liability for unlawful deaths and injuries caused by fully autonomous weapons, or “killer robots,” Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. The report was issued in advance of a multilateral meeting on the weapons at the United Nations in Geneva.

The 38-page report, “Mind the Gap: The Lack of Accountability for Killer Robots,” details significant hurdles to assigning personal accountability for… Read more about The ‘Killer Robots’ Accountability Gap

Former HRP Colleague Jim Cavallaro Elected Vice Chair of Inter-American Commission of Human Rights

Former HRP Colleague Jim Cavallaro Elected Vice Chair of Inter-American Commission of Human Rights

April 2, 2015

Posted by The Human Rights Program

In the flurry of activity these past few weeks, we were remiss in not making an important announcement: Our good friend and former HRP colleague, James Cavallaro, was elected Vice Chair of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights on March 13. This is an honor much deserved, and we’re excited to… Read more about Former HRP Colleague Jim Cavallaro Elected Vice Chair of Inter-American Commission of Human Rights

Death penalty, in retreat

Death penalty, in retreat

February 3, 2015

Carol Steiker’s interest in criminal justice took hold while she was at Harvard Law School (HLS) in the 1980s. While studying there, she recalled, “It began to appear to me that criminal justice was a great engine of American inequality.” Steiker became interested in capital punishment while clerking for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, an ardent opponent of the death penalty. Now the Henry J. Friendly Professor of Law at HLS, Steiker is using her year as the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study’s Rita E. Hauser Fellow to work… Read more about Death penalty, in retreat

Torture is a culture. Releasing the Senate report is a way of fighting it.

Torture is a culture. Releasing the Senate report is a way of fighting it.

January 8, 2015

The Senate Intelligence Committee's report on the CIA's Bush-era torture regime is an absolute outrage. The stark descriptions of exactly what the CIA did to its prisoners — "Majid Khan's lunch tray, consisting of hummus, pasta with sauce, nuts, and raisins was 'pureed' and rectally infused" — give the lie to the idea that the "enhanced interrogation" program was anything but institutionalized torture.