Classes

The Civil Rights Movement, Race and Policy in Modern America (DPI-393)

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2016

This course traces the development of the American civil rights movement over the course of the 20th and 21st century, exploring many of the major sites of protest, opposition and resistance, via the concept of the long "black freedom struggle." Beginning with Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) and ending with the "Black Lives Matter" campaign (2015), our investigation will focus on three broad themes: equal citizenship, strategies of leadership, and public policy: approaches and solutions. Some of the questions we will cover include: who "counts" as a civil rights activist? What are the priorities

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Child Protection in Theory and Practice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2016

The Child Protection sector now consists of a multitude of organizations that have an ever-increasing need to coordinate. The number of development and humanitarian Child Protection actors now spans United Nations agencies, human rights bodies, local, national and international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), national and local governments, intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), bilateral governmental development and humanitarian agencies, small civil society organizations (CSOs), international financial institutions (IFIs), other multilateral institutions, advocacy groups,

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Bioethics, Law, and the Life Sciences

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2016

Developments in the life sciences and biotechnology have called into question existing policy approaches and instruments dealing with intellectual property, reproduction, health, informed consent, and privacy. These shifts in understanding are reconstituting concepts of the self and its boundaries, kinship, human nature, and legal rights and obligations of people in relation to their governing institutions. Through reading primary materials and relevant secondary literatures, this course seeks to identify and explore salient ethical, legal, and policy issues -- and possible solutions

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Advanced Topics in Women, Gender and Health

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2016

This interdepartmental, interdisciplinary seminar will offer the chance to analyze ways by which diverse constructs of gender influence public health research and practice. Using different examples each week, the core WGH faculty and students will focus on how gender contributes to classifying, surveying, understanding and intervening on population distributions of health, disease, and well-being. Discussion of these examples will draw on different disciplines, conceptual frameworks, and methodological approaches (both quantitative and qualitative). For example, traditional

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Childhood, Adolescence, Youth, and International Human Rights

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2015

Since ratification of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child twenty years ago, considerable progress has been made in advancing young childrens enjoyment of basic social and economic rights including access to basic education and health care. These gains are not matched by corresponding advances for older children, particularly girls, minorities, and migrants: in many developing societies, secondary and tertiary education remains widely inaccessible, maternal mortality remains the largest cause of female teenage death, and youth unemployment and violence have reached epidemic

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Environmental Law and Policy Clinic

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

This clinic requires that students have taken or are currently taking at least one of the courses listed below. Failure to meet the pre-/co-requisite course requirement will result in the student being dropped from the clinic.
Environmental Law (fall 2015); Supreme Court and the Environment (fall 2015); Energy Law and Policy (fall 2015); International Environmental Law (winter 2016); Advanced Environmental Law in Theory and Application (spring 2016); Natural Resources Law (spring 2016).

EXPOS 20 - Expository Writing 20

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

 An intensive seminar that aims to improve each student?s ability to discover and reason about evidence through the medium of essays. Each section focuses on a particular theme or topic, described on the Expos Website. All sections give students practice in formulating questions, analyzing both primary and secondary sources and properly acknowledging them, supporting arguments with strong and detailed evidence, and shaping clear, lively essays. All sections emphasize revision.

Disease Distribution Theory/A

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

This course offers an introduction to the social and scientific contexts, content, and implications of theories of disease distribution , past and present. It considers how these theories shape questions people ask about--and explanations and interventions they offer for--patterns of health, disease, and well-being in their societies. Designed for both master level and doctoral level students, SBS 506 also serves a pre-requisite for SBS 507, the in-depth continuation of the course required for SBS doctoral students. SBS 506 accordingly begins by reviewing the role of theory in the

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Global Governance

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

This course focuses on the interplay among states, international organizations (such as the UN, WTO, IMF, and World Bank), multinational corporations, civil society organizations, and activist networks in global governance. Cases are drawn from a broad range of issue areas, including peace and security, economic relations, human rights, and the environment. The objective is to better understand the evolution of global governance arrangements and what difference they make, in light of globalization and emerging geopolitical changes.

HIST 1513 - History of Modern Latin America

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

This course surveys Latin America from its 19th-century independence movements through the present day. How did the powerful legacies of European colonialism, and the neocolonial economic order that emerged to replace it, shape the Americas' new nations? Themes include nationalism and identity, revolution and counterrevolution, populism, state formation, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, social movements, the role of foreign powers, inequality and social class, dictatorship, democratization, and human rights.

Issues in Hlth & Human Rights

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the application of the human rights framework to a wide range of critical areas of public health. Through lectures, cases and guest speakers, students will become familiar with the human rights perspective as applied to selected public health policies, programs and interventions. The course clarifies how human rights approaches complement and differ from those of bioethics and public health ethics. Among the issues to be considered from a human rights perspective are the bioethics, torture prevention and treatment, infectious

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Public International Law

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

This is an introductory course on public international law, which is the body of rules governing relations both between states and, increasingly, between a diverse set of actors, including individuals, civil society, international institutions, NGOs, and corporations. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the foundational rules of the international legal system, which are vitally important to a wide range of global policy challenges such as waging war, combating terrorism, preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, protecting human rights, preserving the

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Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinic

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

For over twenty-five years, the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinic (HIRC), in partnership with Greater Boston Legal Services (GBLS), has focused on direct representation of individuals applying for U.S. asylum and related relief, as well as representation of individuals who have survived domestic violence and other crimes and/or who seek avoidance of forced removal in immigration proceedings (i.e., VAWA, U-visas, Cancellation of Removal, Temporary Protected Status, etc.). HIRC is also involved in appellate and policy advocacy at the local, national, and international levels.

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History of Human Rights

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

This course asks how we should understand the rise of contemporary human rights -- as a set of norms, an ethical project in the world, and as a set of institutions and laws. Starting far back in Western history, the course begins by asking what the basic moral building blocks of contemporary human rights culture - humanity, rights, compassion, pain and so on - mean and takes up what history has to say about them. In the second half of the course, we turn to the origins of the set of institutions, like governmental and intergovernmental structures and non-governmental movements, that is now

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