Harvard School of Public Health

Forthcoming
Power, Suffering, and the Struggle for Dignity. Human Rights Frameworks for Health and Why They Matter
Yamin AE. Power, Suffering, and the Struggle for Dignity. Human Rights Frameworks for Health and Why They Matter. University of Pennsylvania Press; Forthcoming.Abstract

 

"This book deftly illustrates the core purpose of a human rights-based approach—eradicating the suffering arising from dramatic inequality within and between nations."—From the Foreword by Paul Farmer.

Directed at a diverse audience of students, legal and public health practitioners, and anyone interested in understanding what human rights-based approaches (HRBAs) to health and development mean and why they matter, Power, Suffering, and the Struggle for Dignity provides a solid foundation for comprehending what a human rights framework implies and the potential for social transformation it entails. Applying a human rights framework to health demands that we think about our own suffering and that of others, as well as the fundamental causes of that suffering. What is our agency as human subjects with rights and dignity, and what prevents us from acting in certain circumstances? What roles are played by others in decisions that affect our health? How do we determine whether what we may see as "natural" is actually the result of mutable, human policies and practices?

Alicia Ely Yamin couples theory with personal examples of HRBAs at work and shows the impact they have had on people's lives and health outcomes. Analyzing the successes of and challenges to using human rights frameworks for health, Yamin charts what can be learned from these experiences, from conceptualization to implementation, setting out explicit assumptions about how we can create social transformation. The ultimate concern of Power, Suffering, and the Struggle for Dignity is to promote movement from analysis to action, so that we can begin to use human rights frameworks to effect meaningful social change in global health, and beyond.

2015
Power, Suffering, and the Struggle for Dignity
Yamin A. Power, Suffering, and the Struggle for Dignity. UPenn; 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Directed at a diverse audience of students, legal and public health practitioners, and anyone interested in understanding what human rights-based approaches (HRBAs) to health and development mean and why they matter, Power, Suffering, and the Struggle for Dignity provides a solid foundation for comprehending what a human rights framework implies and the potential for social transformation it entails. Applying a human rights framework to health demands that we think about our own suffering and that of others, as well as the fundamental causes of that suffering. What is our agency as human subjects with rights and dignity, and what prevents us from acting in certain circumstances? What roles are played by others in decisions that affect our health? How do we determine whether what we may see as "natural" is actually the result of mutable, human policies and practices?

Alicia Ely Yamin couples theory with personal examples of HRBAs at work and shows the impact they have had on people's lives and health outcomes. Analyzing the successes of and challenges to using human rights frameworks for health, Yamin charts what can be learned from these experiences, from conceptualization to implementation, setting out explicit assumptions about how we can create social transformation. The ultimate concern of Power, Suffering, and the Struggle for Dignity is to promote movement from analysis to action, so that we can begin to use human rights frameworks to effect meaningful social change in global health, and beyond.

Alicia Ely Yamin is lecturer on law and global health and policy director at the Francois-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University, and director of the J.D. M.P.H. Program at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health.

Indicators to measure child poverty in the SDGs
Morgan R. Indicators to measure child poverty in the SDGs.; 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Indicators to measure child poverty in the SDGs, March 2015. The Coalition of Partners Working to End Child Poverty – of which Harvard FXB is a founding member – has developed a policy brief that assesses how child poverty can be included as part of the new monitoring framework of the SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals). The brief provides specific recommendations to support United Nations member states in framing their new poverty reduction indicators post 2015.
See the Policy Brief (PDF) and statement by Save the Children and UNICEF here:

Strategies to Combat Segregation of Roma Children in Schools
Matache M. Strategies to Combat Segregation of Roma Children in Schools.; 2015 pp. 126. Publisher's VersionAbstract

A report "Strategies to Combat Segregation of Roma Children in Schools," by Matache, M.
This report analyzes rsz_2p1070157the interventions employed by civil society organizations in six European Union countries to advocate for the development and implementation of measures to prevent the segregation of Roma children in schools. The report presents six case studies based on in-depth literature review and conversations with communities, experts, and stakeholders in Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Greece, Hungary and Romania.

Click here to read a brief version (digest) of the report.

The MDGs, Capabilities and Human Rights, The power of numbers to shape agendas
Fukuda-Parr S. The MDGs, Capabilities and Human Rights, The power of numbers to shape agendas. Routledge; 2015.Abstract

Heralded as opening a new chapter in international development, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have led to the use of global goals and quantitative targets as a central instrument for defining global priorities. This book explores the implications of this new approach. How does target setting influence policy priorities of national governments, bilateral donors, multilateral agencies, NGOs, and other stakeholders? What are the intended and unintended consequences? Why is the use of numeric indicators effective? How does quantification reshape meanings of challenges such as women’s empowerment?

Chan A. High Court of Kenya to Address Forced Sterilization of HIV-Positive Women and Collection of Names of People Living With HIV. Health and Human Rights Journal/Blog [Internet]. 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The High Court of Kenya has begun reviewing two important cases on the human rights of people living with HIV. The first concerns the forced or coerced sterilization of HIV-positive women; the second challenges a directive from Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta to […]

2014
Matache M. Accelerating Patterns of Anti-Roma Violence in Hungary. Boston: FXB Center for Health And Human Rights, Harvard School of Public Health; 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Accelerating Patterns of Anti-Roma Violence in Hungary Report by Margareta Matache, Arlan Fuller.
This analysis aims to alert the United Nations Office of the Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide and other intergovernmental bodies to the persistent patterns of violent attacks and actions against the Roma in Hungary. It argues that the resurgence of hate crimes and discrimination indicates a need for vigorous early assessment of the risk of violence and for measures to ensure the safety of Roma and other minority groups.
Read report here:

Bhabha J. Post-war Kosovo and Its Policies Towards the Roma, Ashkali, and Egyptian communities. FXB Center for Health And Human Rights, Harvard School of Public Health; 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Post-war Kosovo and Its Policies Towards the Roma, Ashkali, and Egyptian report contributors: Jacqueline Bhabha, Margareta Matache, Carrie Bronsther and Bonnie Shnayerson.

FXB Harvard. Post-war Kosovo and Its Policies Towards the Roma, Ashkali, and Egyptian communities, July 2014. In a climate of complex parallel structures, post-war tensions, and historical prejudice, a Harvard FXB research team examined the barriers to Roma, Ashkali, and Egyptian access to education, employment and documentary proof of identity. The team also probed issues of national identity and values, in view of Kosovo’s struggles to integrate minority communities and become a multicultural society.
Read report here:

Running Out of Time: Survival of Syrian Refugee Children in Lebanon
Bartells S. Running Out of Time: Survival of Syrian Refugee Children in Lebanon. FXB Center for Health And Human Rights, Harvard School of Public Health; 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Running Out of Time: Survival of Syrian Refugee Children in Lebanon report was written by Susan Bartels, MD, MPH  and Kathleen Hamill, JD, MALD This report documents the findings of Capture-Lebanon policy brief 2014a rapid assessment of the needs of Syrian refugee children in Lebanon undertaken over 10 days in November 2013. A two-person team interviewed Syrian refugee families in Beirut, Tripoli, and the Bekaa, as well as a broad spectrum of informed staff at local and international NGOs and agencies. The report addresses stressful living conditions, deprivation of basic needs, social isolation, and child labor, among others. Also discussed is the response of the Lebanese government and international actors to the growing humanitarian crisis.
Read Policy brief here:

Syrian Refugees in Jordan: Urgent Issues and Recommendations
Abisaab J. Syrian Refugees in Jordan: Urgent Issues and Recommendations. FXB Center for Health And Human Rights, Harvard School of Public Health; 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Policy Brief by Josyann Abisaab, Satchit Balsari, Zeina Ali Siam, Arlan Fuller, Kathleen Hamill, Jennifer Leaning
This policy brief, based on a Harvard FXB field investigation in Jordan in June 2014 and drawing on a prior FXB field investigation conducted in Lebanon in November 2013, presents an assessment of key problems and provides key recommendations to the policy community aimed at improving life conditions for the estimated 600,000 Syrian refugees now in Jordan.

Tainted Carpets: Slavery and Child Labor in India’s Hand-Made Carpet Sector
Kara S. Tainted Carpets: Slavery and Child Labor in India’s Hand-Made Carpet Sector. FXB Center for Health And Human Rights, Harvard School of Public Health; 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This investigation sought to fill gaps in previous studies of India’s handmade carpet sector. Over 3,200 cases covering 9 states in northern India are investigated. The report covers “all modes of slave-like labor exploitation” in the carpet sector and documents the supply chain from production source to retail markets in the United States.
Read report here:

Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age
Bhabha J. Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age. Princeton University Press; 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Why, despite massive public concern, is child trafficking on the rise? Why are unaccompanied migrant children living on the streets and routinely threatened with deportation to their countries of origin? Why do so many young refugees of war-ravaged and failed states end up warehoused in camps, victimized by the sex trade, or enlisted as child soldiers? This book provides the first comprehensive account of the widespread but neglected global phenomenon of child migration, exploring the complex challenges facing children and adolescents who move to join their families, those who are moved to be exploited, and those who move simply to survive.

Spanning several continents and drawing on the actual stories of young migrants, the book shows how difficult it is for children to reunite with parents who left them behind to seek work abroad. It looks at the often-insurmountable obstacles we place in the paths of adolescents fleeing war, exploitation, or destitution; the contradictory elements in our approach to international adoption; and the limited support we give to young people brutalized as child soldiers. Part history, part in-depth legal and political analysis, this powerful book challenges the prevailing wisdom that widespread protection failures are caused by our lack of awareness of the problems these children face, arguing instead that our societies have a deep-seated ambivalence to migrant children—one we need to address head-on.Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age offers a road map for doing just that, and makes a compelling and courageous case for an international ethics of children’s human rights.

Bhabha J. Human Rights and Adolescence.; 2014 pp. 376.Abstract

http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/15267.html

While young children's rights have received considerable attention and have accordingly advanced over the last two decades, adolescent rights have been neglected, resulting in a serious rights lacuna. This manifests itself in pervasive gender-based violence, widespread youth disaffection and unemployment, concerning levels of self-abuse, violence and antisocial engagement, and serious mental and physical health deficits. The cost of inaction on these issues is likely to be dramatic in terms of human suffering, lost social and economic opportunities, and threats to global peace and security. Across the range of disciplines that make up contemporary human rights, from law and social advocacy, to global health, to history, economics, sociology, politics, and psychology, it is time for adolescent rights to occupy a coherent place of their own.

Human Rights and Adolescence presents a multifaceted inquiry into the global circumstances of adolescents, focused on the human rights challenges and socioeconomic obstacles young adults face. Contributors use new research to advance feasible solutions and timely recommendations for a wide range of issues spanning all continents, from relevant international legal norms to neuropsychological adolescent brain development, gender discrimination in Indian education to Colombian child soldier recruitment, stigmatization of Roma youth in Europe to economic disempowerment of Middle Eastern and South African adolescents. Taken together, the research emphasizes the importance of dedicated attention to adolescence as a distinctive and critical phase of development between childhood and adulthood, and outlines the task of building on the potential of adolescents while providing support for the challenges they experience.

Health and Human Rights Journal. [Internet]. 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Health and Human Rights began publication in 1994 under the editorship of Jonathan Mann. Paul Farmer, co-founder of Partners In Health, assumed the editorship in 2007. Health and Human Rights is an online, open-access publication.

Health and Human Rights provides an inclusive forum for action-oriented dialogue among human rights practitioners. The journal endeavors to increase access to human rights knowledge in the health field by linking an expanded community of readers and contributors. Following the lead of a growing number of open access publications, the full text of Health and Human Rights is freely available to anyone with internet access.

Health and Human Rights focuses rigorous scholarly analysis on the conceptual foundations and challenges of rights discourse and action in relation to health. The journal is dedicated to empowering new voices from the field — highlighting the innovative work of groups and individuals in direct engagement with human rights struggles as they relate to health. We seek to foster engaged scholarship and reflective activism. In doing so, we invite informed action to realize the full spectrum of human rights.

Health and Human Rights publishes two issues each year in June and December.

The Health and Human Rights website provides additional opportunities for interactive dialogue on pertinent controversial topics and news. A regularly updated “Perspectives” section provides space for contributors to share information and express their views on a broad range of topics, including but not limited to the themes of the journal’s print issues. The HHR blog highlights recent relevant news and includes short opinion pieces from guest bloggers.

2013
The Millennium Development Goals and Human Rights. Past, Present and Future
eds. Langford, M SYA & AE. The Millennium Development Goals and Human Rights. Past, Present and Future. Cambridge University Press; 2013.Abstract

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have generated tremendous discussion in global policy and academic circles. On the one hand, they have been hailed as the most important initiative ever in international development. On the other hand, they have been described as a great betrayal of human rights and universal values that has contributed to a depoliticization of development. With contributions from scholars from the fields of economics, law, politics, medicine and architecture, this volume sets out to disentangle this debate in both theory and practice. It critically examines the trajectory of the MDGs, the role of human rights in theory and practice, and what criteria might guide the framing of the post-2015 development agenda. The book is essential reading for anyone interested in global agreements on poverty and development.
The first comprehensive interdisciplinary study of the relationship between the MDGs and human rights
Provides both a historical perspective and a range of ideas for informing the post-2015 development agenda
Contains a diverse range of perspectives from different disciplines
Authors use different approaches from empirical case studies through to quantitative methods and legal analyses

2012
The Cost of InactionCase Studies from Rwanda and Angola
Sudhir Anand. The Cost of InactionCase Studies from Rwanda and Angola. FXB Harvard/Harvard University Press; 2012.Abstract

This book is motivated by the idea that the cost of inaction can be much greater than the cost of action. Inaction can lead to serious negative consequences—for individuals, the economy, and society. The consequences of a failure to reduce extreme poverty, for example, typically include malnutrition, preventable morbidity, premature mortality, incomplete basic education, and other human and social development costs. In this volume, the authors seek to clarify exactly what is meant by “cost of inaction.” They develop a methodology to account for the consequences and estimate the costs of a failure to respond to the needs of children and their families. Their conceptual framework emphasizes the need to select appropriate actions against which inaction is evaluated. The authors present the results of applying the cost of inaction (COI) approach to six case studies from Rwanda and Angola. The case studies highlight important differences between the COI approach and benefit-cost analysis as it is traditionally implemented.

2011
Children Without a StateA Global Human Rights Challenge
Bhabha J. Children Without a StateA Global Human Rights Challenge. The MIT Press; 2011.Abstract

Children are among the most vulnerable citizens of the world, with a special need for the protections, rights, and services offered by states. And yet children are particularly at risk from statelessness. Thirty-six percent of all births in the world are not registered, leaving more than forty-eight million children under the age of five with no legal identity and no formal claim on any state. Millions of other children are born stateless or become undocumented as a result of migration. Children Without a State is the first book to examine how statelessness affects children throughout the world, examining this largely unexplored problem from a human rights perspective. 

The human rights repercussions explored range from dramatic abuses (detention and deportation) to social marginalization (lack of access to education and health care). The book provides a variety of examples, including chapters on Palestinian children in Israel, undocumented young people seeking higher education in the United States, unaccompanied child migrants in Spain, Roma children in Italy, irregular internal child migrants in China, and children in mixed legal/illegal families in the United States.

Litigating Health Rights. Can Courts Bring More Justice to Health?
Yamin, A.E. G& S. Litigating Health Rights. Can Courts Bring More Justice to Health?. Harvard University Press, 2011.; 2011. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The last fifteen years have seen a tremendous growth in the number of health rights cases focusing on issues such as access to health services and essential medications. This volume examines the potential of litigation as a strategy to advance the right to health by holding governments accountable for these obligations. It includes case studies from Costa Rica, South Africa, India, Brazil, Argentina and Colombia, as well as chapters that address cross-cutting themes.

The authors analyze what types of services and interventions have been the subject of successful litigation and what remedies have been ordered by courts. Different chapters address the systemic impact of health litigation efforts, taking into account who benefits both directly and indirectly—and what the overall impacts on health equity are.

2007
Seeking Asylum Alone - a Comparative Study: Unaccompanied and Separated Children and Refugee Protection in Australia, the UK and the US
Bhabha J. Seeking Asylum Alone - a Comparative Study: Unaccompanied and Separated Children and Refugee Protection in Australia, the UK and the US. Themis Press; 2007.Abstract

"Then I was enclosed in a small room ...I could see faces of other young people in their own cells. We had a place to sleep, a cell, very hot, it had a toilet. My heart started to race in the room. I was worried. I didn't know what was going to happen to me". These are the words of a seventeen-year-old boy who fled gang violence in El Salvador only to find himself in a detention centre in Texas. His experience, and that of the thousands of other children who cross borders unaccompanied every year in search of protection, is explored in a new international study, Seeking Asylum Alone. This international comparative report describes the nature and scale of the migration of unaccompanied and separated children, the complex and unsatisfactory policies and procedures which funnel children through an adversarial system that frequently ignores their best interests and violates their human rights, and the range of remedies available to children. Drawing on government data, court proceedings and hundreds of interviews with officials, advocates and the children themselves, the report highlights serious deficiencies in current practice. It documents the inadequacy of current data collection, the hurdles children face in getting access to a place of safety, the inadequacies of reception, detention, and care systems, the severe limitations on legal representation and due process, and the unsatisfactory state of final protection outcomes. The report arrives at two general conclusions. One is that the serious protection deficits highlighted by the data require urgent rectification: children should be treated as children first and non-citizens or aliens second, if states' human rights obligations are going to be met. The second conclusion is that many unaccompanied or separated children have a stronger claim to asylum under international law than is generally recognized, and that child specific persecution should be investigated more seriously and systematically: legal actors should substitute for their adult centred lens a more child centred focus. The recommendations that follow from these conclusions can, the report argues, be implemented relatively easily and economically, with more systematic training and monitoring, and without jeopardizing states' migration management programs. Directed by two law professors, Jacqueline Bhabha, a lecturer at Harvard Law School, and Mary Crock, an associate professor at Sydney Law School, the two year comparative research project documents the circumstances and treatment of unaccompanied and separated child asylum seekers in three key destination countries, the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia. The study has resulted in four substantial research reports, one on each of the three countries in which research was conducted, and this fourth generic and comparative report, which brings together all the country specific findings. All the reports are now accessible on-line at: http://www.humanrights.harvard.edu; and at www.law.usyd.edu.au/scigl Also available Seeking Asylum Alone - A study of Australian law, policy and practice regarding unaccompanied and separated children, by Mary Crock.