Classes

Disability, Human Rights, and Development

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2015

This course will examine the current and future status of disability rights as a focus for both human rights theory and for thinking about what constitutes development and development assistance. After reviewing the historical status of disabled persons both practically and within the international human rights system, we will examine the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the first human rights treaty of the twenty-first century.

Anthropology and Human Rights

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2015

This course combines an introduction to the formal, theoretical, and normative structures of human rights with analyses of contemporary case studies. It illustrates several critical human rights issues, debates, and practices that demonstrate the increasing significance of ethnographic field methods and related interpretive analysis. Accepting that agreement on and realization of human rights often require negotiation and compromise, the course illustrates why, and suggests how, realization of many broadly-defined human rights requires specific contextualization.

International Human Rights Clinic

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2014

Through the International Human Rights Clinic, students merge theory with practice and learn core skills necessary to become effective and thoughtful human rights advocates. Students work on pressing and timely human rights problems around the world, in collaboration with leading international and local human rights organizations. Those in the Clinic have the opportunity to explore a range of approaches to advancing the interests of clients and affected communities.

Field Exp Health & Human Rights

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2014

In this course, students will acquire the basic skills in applying a human rights framework to health issues in a professional work environment. Depending on their field placement, they may learn about operational skills in settings where health and human rights are practiced or about organizing a study to investigate human rights conditions affecting health. Each student will be expected, in consultation with the instructor, to identify an organization engaged in relevant work for the Winter Session period and secure a placement within that organization.

Visual Justice: Documentary Film and Human Rights

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2014

This course will examine how visual stories affect the practice of human rights advocacy. With weekly documentary film screenings, we will examine the interconnectedness of advocacy and visual representations. Considering that documentaries make a claim to represent "the real," is there a commensurate way to visually represent human capacities for suffering and violence? What are the challenges that activists and filmmakers face when they are representing experiences and perspectives different than their own?

The Theory and Practice of Human Rights

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2014

Why do human rights violations occur and what can be done to prevent them? What difference do human rights treaties make for changing state practices? How can governments, international organizations, and human rights NGOs contribute to bringing about positive human rights change? This class will integrate reading, discussion, and class projects of the theory and practice of human rights to try to answer these questions and others.

Social Studies 98oa - Human Rights in Africa

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2014

How and to what extent are human rights discussed, contested, and protected in Sub-Saharan Africa? This course considers answers to this question by taking seriously both variation and commonalities across Sub-Saharan African countries. Topics covered include slavery, apartheid, social and economic rights, LGBT rights, the International Criminal Court, and Kony 2012. The study of human rights in any context also requires some understanding of the configurations of power, state institutions and civil society in that context.

Introduction to Human Rights and Justice

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2014

This course seeks to give an introduction to contemporary discussions about justice, human rights, and religion. It will survey the conceptions of rights within political theology and within contemporary theories of justice. Special attention will be given to the work of Rawls, Habermas, Nussbaum, Sen, Walzer, Sandel, Moltmann, Woltersdorf, and Schmitt. It will seek to show how a conception of human rights relates to religion within the framework of a discourse ethics. Note: Last hour of course is a required discussion session.

Human Rights and the Environment

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2014

Over the past half century, human rights law and environmental law have made great strides largely independently of one another. This clinical seminar will explore a growing field that seeks to bring the two together. Students will examine how the separate legal frameworks intersect and analyze the strategic advantages and disadvantages of linking them. In some circumstances, environmental protection and human rights promotion benefit each other, while in others, these two worthy causes can be at odds.

Human Rights Dilemmas in Child Protection

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2014

A growing number of children and adolescents around the world are subjected to violence, exploitation and other forms of abuse. These harms persist despite the proliferation of international norms and structures designed to protect this population and promote its wellbeing. In many cases global transformations exacerbate rather than reduce the risks of abuse and increase the protection challenges these risks give rise to. Though each category of child protection deficit has its own characteristics and its attendant normative framework, they all share common and definable elements.

Human Rights Advocacy

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2014

Human rights norms and discourse are employed widely by advocates around the world in their struggles for social justice. This course explores what it means to be a human rights advocate, whether one is engaged in debates over U.S. policy at home and abroad, the role of corporations in alleged violations, or the role of rights in times of transitions from conflict. Through case studies and role plays, this seminar examines the various dimensions and limitations of human rights advocacy, including strategic, ethical, and tactical challenges.

Freshman Seminar 46p - Human Rights in Peace and War

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2014

Studies how human rights perspective illuminates relations between state authority and individuals and defines standards of behavior that societies agree to aspire to reach. Topics include the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, rights in political and economic spheres, the rights of women, children, and refugees, international human rights law and international humanitarian law, and the state, regional, and international processes and structures that establish and monitor the regime of international human rights law.

Freshman Seminar 41k - Human Rights, Law and Advocacy

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2014

Human rights practitioners confront numerous ethical, strategic, and legal dilemmas in their struggles for social justice. This freshman seminar explores the underlying legal framework in which human rights advocates operate, and then uses specific case studies to consider the various challenges they must grapple with in their work.

Conflict, Ethics and Human Rights: Assessing the role of Religion in International Politics

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2014

The end of the Cold War was characterized not only by the collapse of old Empires and the rise of new economic forces, but also by the emergence of ethnic and religious groups in world politics. Everywhere we witnessed greater tensions and confrontations between cultures or religious based politics and the international system based on secular ethics. This course will address the following questions: Why has secular nationalism failed? Why is religion seen as a legitimate alternative form of politics nationally and internationally?

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